June 4, 2012
8964. 有些事,不是看到希望才去堅持,而是因為堅持了才看到希望。
8964. Sometimes, you don’t persist because you see hope; you only see hope because you persist.
8964. Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.

8964. 有些事,不是看到希望才去堅持,而是因為堅持了才看到希望。

8964. Sometimes, you don’t persist because you see hope; you only see hope because you persist.

8964. Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.

(Source: rockstarchinaman)

6:45am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZuwNYyMkADhU
  
Filed under: tiananmen june 4th 
June 4, 2011
China: Tiananmen, 22 years on, the repressive patterns continue.

China: Tiananmen, 22 years on, the repressive patterns continue.

June 4, 2011
Each year thousands upon thousands gather in Victoria Park in Hong Kong for a candlelight vigil to commemorate the students who sacrificed their life to fight for democracy in Beijing on the 4th of June, 1989. That would be 22 years ago.
Ding Zilin’s son died when he was 17. He would be 39 years old today. She is 74 years old today. And many mothers like her, are kept under house arrest during the anniversary of the unfortunate Tiananmen Massacre. Imagine, not only is your son brutally murdered, his murder has never been acknowledged by the perpetrators, you continue to be oppressed, and you are prevent from offering prayers for your child’s death. No, you are not to mourn in public, and you are not allowed to even leave a wreath on the Square.

Tiananmen Mothers is a group of very normal folks who lost family members on June 4th. The Chinese government has never acknowledged any deaths or massacre. But to whom did these mothers and fathers lost their children to? Over the past two decades, HRIC and Amnesty International have published open letters in numerous publications with the Tiananmen Mothers, to push for their demands, which is very very depressing to think of, since these are such basic human rights. The demands are such as no more persecution of June Fourth victims, the release of people still suffering in prison for their role in the 1989 protests, no more arresting people for talking about 1989. And they would like to be able to mourn in public peacefully for their loved ones, too.

People have the tendency to think that human rights is a very abstract and distant topic. Sometimes I get the feeling that many think human rights is useless. Not for Ding Zilin and mothers like her. Life and death is universal, as is love. And then there are the living. Aside from the controversial Ai Wei Wei, there are over hundreds of political prisoners abducted and who are “disappeared” (note: not a grammatical error, but they are indeed caught and are missing in this sensitive period, hence this new colloquial term in China).

Every year thousands from Mainland China flock to Hong Kong, a Special Administrative Region, to attend the vigil at Victoria Park. Today I spoke to many who crossed the border to commemorate the victims. I saw for myself how many of them are still held captive by the loss of their loved ones,despite their physical freedom. And then I thought about those who lost their children, and never got to see their redress in their lifetime.

Some people choose to dilute the issue at hand, some people choose to rationalise it with China’s enviable economic progress. But there will not be any absolute amnesia. There is conscience, and behind that conscience is the will to never forget until we can redress the victims of the massacre - to 平反六四, and to make sure that those who continue to oppress will not be able to erase the history of June 4th 1989 on our behalf - to 毋忘六四.
Extended Reading:
NPR: Tiananmen Mothers Press For Answers, 20 Years On
Amnesty International: Free Nobel Laureate, Liu Xiaobo

Each year thousands upon thousands gather in Victoria Park in Hong Kong for a candlelight vigil to commemorate the students who sacrificed their life to fight for democracy in Beijing on the 4th of June, 1989. That would be 22 years ago.

Ding Zilin’s son died when he was 17. He would be 39 years old today. She is 74 years old today. And many mothers like her, are kept under house arrest during the anniversary of the unfortunate Tiananmen Massacre. Imagine, not only is your son brutally murdered, his murder has never been acknowledged by the perpetrators, you continue to be oppressed, and you are prevent from offering prayers for your child’s death. No, you are not to mourn in public, and you are not allowed to even leave a wreath on the Square.

Tiananmen Mothers is a group of very normal folks who lost family members on June 4th. The Chinese government has never acknowledged any deaths or massacre. But to whom did these mothers and fathers lost their children to? Over the past two decades, HRIC and Amnesty International have published open letters in numerous publications with the Tiananmen Mothers, to push for their demands, which is very very depressing to think of, since these are such basic human rights. The demands are such as no more persecution of June Fourth victims, the release of people still suffering in prison for their role in the 1989 protests, no more arresting people for talking about 1989. And they would like to be able to mourn in public peacefully for their loved ones, too.

People have the tendency to think that human rights is a very abstract and distant topic. Sometimes I get the feeling that many think human rights is useless. Not for Ding Zilin and mothers like her. Life and death is universal, as is love. And then there are the living. Aside from the controversial Ai Wei Wei, there are over hundreds of political prisoners abducted and who are “disappeared” (note: not a grammatical error, but they are indeed caught and are missing in this sensitive period, hence this new colloquial term in China).

Every year thousands from Mainland China flock to Hong Kong, a Special Administrative Region, to attend the vigil at Victoria Park. Today I spoke to many who crossed the border to commemorate the victims. I saw for myself how many of them are still held captive by the loss of their loved ones,despite their physical freedom. And then I thought about those who lost their children, and never got to see their redress in their lifetime.

Some people choose to dilute the issue at hand, some people choose to rationalise it with China’s enviable economic progress. But there will not be any absolute amnesia. There is conscience, and behind that conscience is the will to never forget until we can redress the victims of the massacre - to 平反六四, and to make sure that those who continue to oppress will not be able to erase the history of June 4th 1989 on our behalf - to 毋忘六四.

Extended Reading:

4:49pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZuwNYy5mp6XG
  
Filed under: Tiananmen Hong Kong 
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